Maddy Harland |
Friday, 21st October 2016
Last September, I was fortunatle to attend the European Permaculture Convergence in the beautiful medieval town of Bolsena in Tuscany. The event was a heady mixture of being with like minds and old friends, some excellent workshops and presentations, Italian hospitality, a beautiful landscape, and a sense of proximity with pre-Roman, Etruscan... more
Philip Greenwood |
Tuesday, 18th October 2016
Biochar is charcoal which is made at lower temperatures than ordinary charcoal (through a chemical process called pyrolysis) and which is used to enrich poor quality and depleted soils. Because it has a sponge-like structure beneficial microbes in the soil can colonise the biochar and so it becomes a 'coral reef' of nutrients for trees and plants... more
John D. Liu |
Tuesday, 18th October 2016
The sun rises on a glorious new day in an Earth Cooperative Restoration Camp. Although this particular camp is in what most would call a desert, in the early morning there is dew on the grass and the birds emerge from the vegetation to forage and sing. The camp is in an area that has been described as abandoned since the failure of agriculture,... more
Paul Alfrey - Balkan Ecology Project |
Friday, 7th October 2016
This spring I was asked to develop a conceptual design for Catherine Zanev and Adjmal Dulloo for a fantastic piece of land on the north side of the Balkan mountains. My goal was to analyse the site and identify the potential of the land for future regenerative development.I've been working with Catherine and Adjmal since 2013 on various sites... more
Alice Griffin |
Tuesday, 4th October 2016
We were sat on the terrace of our cottage in Portugal last summer when my husband decided to whittle a knife from some cherry wood pruned from our orchard. We’d spoken about our desire to be able to make something with our hands, to create in a way that would connect us directly to potential customers and had visited craft shows and been inspired... more
Paul Alfrey - Balkan Ecology Project |
Thursday, 29th September 2016
Originally from Asia Minor, the fig is probably the oldest cultivated fruit in the world. There is evidence to suggest that some 10,000 years ago some of us were planting figs directly outside our caves presumably to be able to slip out for a figgy delight without worrying too much about getting torn to shreds by a Sabre tooth tiger. Man and fig... more
David Holmgren |
Monday, 26th September 2016
I decided to go to college rather than spend the day turning the compost, making bread and maybe finalising the garden plan. The plan, part of my last semester project, was still evolving in my head and on the ground. It seemed crazy to spend a sunny spring day in the 'Dexion' and chipboard rabbit warren that was Environmental Design (E.D.),... more
Wade Muggleton |
Thursday, 22nd September 2016
One of the features of permaculture gardening is that we inevitably experiment with a vast range of crops and my own mantra has always been that ‘Diversity Rules’; the wider the range of species and varieties the more we spread the risk. In any one year some crops will have a good year while others will not. Thus grow a wide enough range and you... more
Alice Griffin |
Wednesday, 21st September 2016
For the last couple of years, my family and I have been living a life divided between our smallholding in the Sao Mamede Natural Park, Portugal, and a narrowboat in the UK. The reasons for continuing the two and not making the leap to Portugal full-time have been varied, but a main one is because we have not yet found a viable way to support... more
Jon Kean |
Thursday, 15th September 2016
Our plot is at 304m (1000ft) and we generally have decent rainfall throughout the year. We have about 2 hectares (6 acres), roughly half grass and half trees. We moved here in 1999 and started a forest garden without much research, and planted apple, pear, plum, blackcurrant, raspberry, strawberry, honey berry, goji berry (has anybody ever got a... more