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Writer

Carl Legge

Permaculture smallholder, former lawyer, chef and food writer.

Carl Legge |
Friday, 15th August 2014
You know that feeling when you pick more courgettes towards the back end of the summer. More! You've eaten them raw, stuffed, sautéed, griddled, baked, on pizza, with pasta, in salads and soups and you just can't face anymore. Now you want to save them for later in the year and you don't want to take an age to process them. Dehydrating them works... more
 
Carl Legge |
Friday, 25th July 2014
These tart and tasty berries have been enjoyed as a nutritious and healthy fruit for centuries. I love their complex, almost smoky, flavour and I love to get the most out of my harvest. So here is another of my multiple product recipes from one batch of ingredients. Permaculture in action - make a regal liqueur and a smashing jam. Blackcurrant... more
 
Carl Legge |
Thursday, 26th June 2014
For me, one of the great joys of garlic are the 'serpents' that coil from the tops of hardneck garlic (Allium sativum var. ophioscorodon). These are best taken off the plant so that the plant concentrates its resources on growing splendid bulbs. Which is a bonus, as the mild garlic heat and taste of the serpents or 'scapes' is a summer treat. If... more
 
Carl Legge |
Monday, 3rd March 2014
With this simple dish you make the most of sweet seasonal roots and the robust taste of winter leaves. Easy to cook in just one pot: it's on your plate in just 15 minutes from the first ingredient hitting the water. And you get a grand flavoured stock to use for soup as a by product. It's a very healthy dish, with lots of fibre from the veg and... more
 
Carl Legge |
Thursday, 13th December 2012
This is a great book for omnivore permaculturalists. Not to be confused with salami dry cured sausages, salumi is the word for Italian salted and cured meats. The authors take you step-by-step through the process of choosing a pig, butchering it and then converting it into delicious, Italian style, dry cured preserves. Suitable for the chef, semi-... more
 
Carl Legge |
Friday, 2nd November 2012
The nasturtium plant (tropaeoleum majus) is one of the most useful plants in the garden. It attracts pollinating insects and acts as a sacrificial plant for brassicas by attracting caterpillars to its leaves. Its flowers, leaves, seed pods and seeds are prolific & edible and it readily self-seeds. The whole plant has a peppery, watercress-like... more
 
Carl Legge |
Friday, 26th October 2012
If you don’t grow your own, you may see big bunches of parsley in markets. It’s well worth picking these up to make this wonderful ingredient the French call persillade. Persillade in its most basic form is just a mix of finely chopped parsley and garlic. It can also have oil, vinegar or citrus juice and salt added. In my version, the oil protects... more
 
Carl Legge |
Tuesday, 31st January 2012
This wonderful tuber is certainly getting popular. I got involved in identifying a specimen from Jamie Oliver's garden a few days ago . His online editor was after recipe ideas because it was being cooked in Jamie's '15' restaurant. It would be great if Oca now started to get the attention it deserves! One of the first recipe books I bought was... more
 
Carl Legge |
Wednesday, 11th January 2012
It’s obvious that there’s now a growing band of permie people growing this so-called ‘lost crop’ of the Incas. The tubers could easily be the model for gems or ‘power ups’ in a computer game they are so pretty. They come in a range of stunning colours, some with variegated eyes. They need a long growing season and tuber formation does not... more
 
Carl Legge |
Monday, 2nd January 2012
The Resilient Gardener is intended to provide some principles of gardening that are sustainable in the light of climate change, disasters, health and financial issues. So it's more than just 'green gardening'. It looks at 'sustainability' of the garden, gardener and their community in a wide context. This is summed up in the subtitle of the book:... more
 
Carl Legge |
Monday, 19th December 2011
Parsnips have been cooked in Europe since Roman times. Famous Roman foodie Apicius recorded four recipes in his De Re Coquinaria including Coriander Parsnips Cooked in Wine. Another interesting factoid is that they share a flavour compound with peas which makes them perfect partners. Black garlic The black garlic in the recipe arises from a... more
 
Carl Legge |
Monday, 21st November 2011
We're well into pumpkin season and you may be wondering how else to use this seasonal squash. I know some of my baking peers have used it in sourdough bread to good effect. So I set out to work out my own recipe from first principles. Well I'm delighted with the results I got. I roasted the pumpkin with some smoked chipotle chillies, coriander... more
 
Carl Legge |
Monday, 31st October 2011
Darling, I have something to admit. I've been lying to you. Every time I'ver served you up spinach, be it in soup, pies or rissotto, I've actually been feeding you wild things. You've had stinging nettles, dead nettles, purslanes and oraches; I've fed you fat hen, good King Henry and goosegrasss. You've eaten dandelions and thistles. They've come... more
 
Carl Legge |
Thursday, 27th October 2011
Making wine is an ideal way of getting the most out of your harvest and using the bruised and damaged ones. You could make just a 5 litre demi-john. To be honest it’s better to make a big amount to really use a good quantity of apples. The wine you make really can be very good. Your apple variety will affect the taste. The ones I use taste a... more
 
Carl Legge |
Wednesday, 5th October 2011
Us permaculture types like to get the most from our harvest. Remember in the previous blog post, I told you to save those sloes for next time? Well now you get to make these delicious things out of them too... Sloe port recipe In this recipe the sloes are re-macerated with red wine & sugar and then the resultant drink is fortified with a... more
 

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