Bring Back the Lean and Green Father Christmas

Permaculture Magazine & Abundance Generation
Tuesday, 3rd December 2013

Santa, formerly a forest dweller who dressed in green, only started wearing red when he was appropriated by a famous carbonated drinks company. That's when he gained weight. Lets make 2013 the year we take Christmas back from consumerism and bring back the lean, Green Father Christmas.

Christmas has arrived and the mad rush to buy gifts has started. According to the Independent, the UK spent an average of £1,000 per household for Christmas 2012. That is a huge amount of items being bought, many from unethical backgrounds, where those making the products are on low wages and the environment is being plundered for materials. But Christmas doedn't have to be a huge consumer holiday? It can be more thoughtful, less stressful and environmentally friendly and green? 

A new campaign has been launched to resurrect the original green Father Christmas. 'Green Father Christmas' calls for the festive icon to once again embrace his green coat, abandoning his allegiance with big global consumer brands. Coca Cola were the first company to use Father Christmas' coat red to match their branding early in the 20th century and used it in advertising. Originally Father Christmas came from deep within a German forest! Launched by crowdfunding platform Abundance Generation, the campaign stands for a Christmas less focused on consumption. 'Green Father Christmas' calls for those holding a greener Christmas to share his image online, allowing his new look to travel across the world.

This image was last spotted around the 1920's, before the well known drinks company expanded his waistline and donned him in red to promote its brand. Far removed from his modern image, Father Christmas once dressed in green, cut a slim figure, assisting children and those in need.

Abundance Generation, as well as helping Father Christmas find a healthier image, is suggesting its 'Green Energy Investment' as a meaningful gift this Christmas.

Bruce Davis, cofounder and joint Managing Director of Abundance Generation said: "Yes, we're stealing Father Christmas from the drinks industry. We're reuniting him with his green coat because, once again, Christmas is about far more than acquiring 'things'. There's a fast growing shift away from giving material goods, to buying gifts with meaning. We're pretty sure Father Christmas would approve of our Green Energy Investments. A gift that's helping to create a clean energy future, as well as a secure return for people."

In a rare interview, Father Christmas said: "The holidays are coming and I agree it's time for a change. Representing a drinks brand was fun for a while, but the thrill of the ride has grown thin – unlike my waistline. Last year, the elves and I delivered fewer throwaway presents than ever before, this year we want to give better gifts and embrace the move towards a greener Christmas. I haven't worn my green coat for decades but it feels great. It is, admittedly, a little tighter than it used to be."

He continued: "Some of the elves at Abundance Generation have come up with a gift of a 'green energy investment', perfect for those boys and girls who already seem to have everything! Over the last few years I've received an increasing number of letters requesting less disposable 'stuff'. I'm relieved really, I get great joy from making people happy but was really beginning to worry about the environment. All these things are being shipped around the world before arriving in Lapland, and millions of presents end up as clutter or in a hole in the ground."

The gift of a Green Energy Investment includes Abundance Generation membership and a handful of their green energy debentures. You can gift an investment of £5, £10, £50, £100 or £1,000 in solar or wind power projects across the UK, helping friends and family be part of the shift to clean energy. This offers a fixed return of 6.65% IRR over a 19 year duration. Ideal as a gift for children, the investment can put into a bare trust until a child reaches 18 years of age. Gifting a Green Energy Investment is very simple and can be set up via the Abundance Generation online Christmas store: www.abundancegeneration.com/greensanta

It is important to note that, as with any investment product, there are risks. Part or all of the original invested capital may be at risk and any return on investment depends on the success of the project invested in. All products from Abundance are long term investments and may not be readily realisable (and their value can rise or fall). Estimated rates of return are variable and estimates are no guarantee of actual return.

Any sightings of a red Father Christmas are likely to be out of date impersonations, and not the real Father Christmas. 

Further resources

Solar is the viable alternative to new nuclear plants

How to build a solar power plant (as compared to a nuclear power plant)

Renewable energy generation hits all time highs

Read: Do It Yourself 12 Volt Solar Power available in print or as an eBook

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From Grind To Whine |
Mon, 09/12/2013 - 14:07

I am a native of Morristown, NJ, USA. Every child from Morristown learns the history of one of our more famous residents, Thomas Nast.

While I like the green Father Christmas, as a Morristown native, I have to argue this article's facts.

The jolly, plump Santa Claus was not made popular by Coca-Cola in the 1920's as this article states, but instead by Thomas Nast of Morristown, NJ who, in working with Clement C. Moore, created the modern-day image of Santa Claus. Moore's "A Visit from St. Nicholas" was written in 1823, depicting Santa quite clearly through verse (He was dressed all in fur from his head to his foot...he had a round face and a little round belly...). Nast's famous illustration was first published in 1881 and became widely adopted as the true image of Santa.

Therefore, sugary beverages may be to blame for many of our culture's ailments, but Santa was Santa long before soda pop.