Cloning the world's oldest trees to reforest the planet

Rozie Apps
Tuesday, 7th May 2013

Cloning is a controversial subject, but could the earth's ecosystems benefit from the reintroduction of the 'super-tree'?

The non-profit organisation, Archangel Ancient Tree Archive is on a global mission to reforest the earth and clone ancient champion trees from around the world.

Their plan is to archive the genetics of old tree's in living libraries across the world, before they become extinct. These genes will then be cloned to add to the range of trees the organisation are planting.

They believe that some trees have great genes that enable them to live for millennia and grow to be nearly as high as skyscrapers, which could be used to repopulate forests around the world. These 'super-trees' are so big, they have unfortunately become the perfect target for lumberjacks so almost all have been chopped down.

Living libraries will be created across the globe by finding viable shoots which can be found on the stumps of trees that were cut down long ago. They will examine which shoots can be used and then clone these to reforest the earth.

Archangel Ancient Tree Archive believe repopulating the earth with these 'super-trees' will be beneficial to the countless ecoystems, through releasing oxygen, sequestering carbon dioxide, providing beneficial aerosols and medicines and to help fight global warming. 

For more information about Archangel Ancient Tree Archive, visit their website at: www.ancienttreearchive.org 

More resources

Should Cloning be Used to Bring Back Extinct Species?

The Dangers of Genetic Engineering and GM Food

Terry Mock |
Tue, 07/05/2013 - 13:23

In its first effort to recreate a champion tree old growth forest, Archangel Ancient Tree Archive successfully planted a four-acre grove of 2,000 to 3,000-year-old coast redwood and giant sequoia clones near Port Orford, Oregon. Clones came from fifty champion redwoods now living along the Pacific west coast, including cuttings from the 32.5 foot-wide Fieldbrook Stump, a giant redwood that was felled by loggers around 1890.

Beginning on Dec. 5, 2012, Archangel Co-Founder David Milarch, along with Champion Tree Project partner Terry Mock, planted the 250 clones at Ocean Mountain Ranch on a foggy and largely inaccessible mountainside slope, located just north of the coast’s main redwood range. With the help of several foresters, the group planted the foot-and-a-half to three-foot tall trees in three days. The location of this archive was chosen because it is anticipated by scientists that future climate change will require that trees be moved north from their present range in what is being called “assisted migration”. The planting site had been previously cleared and is being restored using mixed-use permaculture principles under a comprehensive sustainable forest stewardship plan being implemented on the ranch.

Will Genetic Clones of the World’s Largest Trees Help to Save the Planet?
http://j.mp/UQNnVV

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