Subscribe Donate

Topics

8 forms of capital agroforestry apples beans bees beneficial berries biodigester blackberries blackthorn book review brain budget build building campesino capital Celtic festivals change changes chemical-free chickens circular clay pot climate change climate solutions climbing cob comfrey community compost compost teas connection consciousness conservation cooking coppice coppicing cordial cosmology crafts crisis cultural emergence culture cycles design diary diversity DIY do it yourself earth care Earth's energy economics ecopoetry ecosystem edges education efficiency elements energy ethics fair shares Fairtrade farming feedback feminine ferns figs firewood flowers food food forest forage foraging forest garden forest gardening fruit fruit trees future future care gardening garlic gift economy gin global poverty grapes greenhouse grow grow your own growing guilds habitat harvest harvests hazel hazelnut health healthy soil hedging herbs holistic planned grazing home homestead Hugelkultur humanure IBC tanks Indigenous inexpensive influence jam land landscape life livelihood livestock logs low cost market garden market gardening marmalade mass heater medicinal microbes mimic mindset mitigation money moringa Mother Earth multifunctional mushrooms native plants natural natural building natural fertiliser natural skincare natural swimming pool nature nitrogen no dig no-dig nutrition nuts observe off-grid orchard orchards organic outdoor shower oven oyster pallets pasture-fed patterns people people care perennials permaculture permaculture design permaculture magazine award permaculutre pests pips pizza oven plant profile plants pollinators polyculture polycultures preserving principles propagating pruning psycho-spiritual awareness psychospiritual transformation rainwater raspberries recipe recipes reduce reed beds regenerative agriculture relative location relative matter renewable renewable energy resources reuse revolution rootstock rootstocks roundhouse roundwood runner beans Scotland seasons Sepp Holzer september septic tanks sewage treatment shrubs skincare sloes slugs small solutions small-scale smallholding social justice soil health solar solutions spiritual spring stacking functions straw straw bale sustainable systems temperate terraces thistles timber timber framing toolkit tools trees upcycle urban vegan vermicomposting walnuts waste watering weeds wellbeing wetland wild food wildlife wings winter salads wood stove woodburner woodland woodland management woodlands worms year-round food yield zoning

Topics

8 forms of capital agroforestry apples beans bees beneficial berries biodigester blackberries blackthorn book review brain budget build building campesino capital Celtic festivals change changes chemical-free chickens circular clay pot climate change climate solutions climbing cob comfrey community compost compost teas connection consciousness conservation cooking coppice coppicing cordial cosmology crafts crisis cultural emergence culture cycles design diary diversity DIY do it yourself earth care Earth's energy economics ecopoetry ecosystem edges education efficiency elements energy ethics fair shares Fairtrade farming feedback feminine ferns figs firewood flowers food food forest forage foraging forest garden forest gardening fruit fruit trees future future care gardening garlic gift economy gin global poverty grapes greenhouse grow grow your own growing guilds habitat harvest harvests hazel hazelnut health healthy soil hedging herbs holistic planned grazing home homestead Hugelkultur humanure IBC tanks Indigenous inexpensive influence jam land landscape life livelihood livestock logs low cost market garden market gardening marmalade mass heater medicinal microbes mimic mindset mitigation money moringa Mother Earth multifunctional mushrooms native plants natural natural building natural fertiliser natural skincare natural swimming pool nature nitrogen no dig no-dig nutrition nuts observe off-grid orchard orchards organic outdoor shower oven oyster pallets pasture-fed patterns people people care perennials permaculture permaculture design permaculture magazine award permaculutre pests pips pizza oven plant profile plants pollinators polyculture polycultures preserving principles propagating pruning psycho-spiritual awareness psychospiritual transformation rainwater raspberries recipe recipes reduce reed beds regenerative agriculture relative location relative matter renewable renewable energy resources reuse revolution rootstock rootstocks roundhouse roundwood runner beans Scotland seasons Sepp Holzer september septic tanks sewage treatment shrubs skincare sloes slugs small solutions small-scale smallholding social justice soil health solar solutions spiritual spring stacking functions straw straw bale sustainable systems temperate terraces thistles timber timber framing toolkit tools trees upcycle urban vegan vermicomposting walnuts waste watering weeds wellbeing wetland wild food wildlife wings winter salads wood stove woodburner woodland woodland management woodlands worms year-round food yield zoning

Permaculture Magazine Award

The Permaculture Magazine Award is an annual celebration of the vital work of permaculture projects from around the world.

The Permaculture Magazine Award was established in 2018 and has awarded 16 projects with over £60,000 to date. The award has received hundreds of applications, and it is a privilege to highlight this vital regenerative work that is world changing.

The aim of the award to is to celebrate and support projects that are:

  • Regenerating damaged land
  • Enhancing habitat and biodiversity
  • Helping people to gain practical and community skills
  • Adding value to produce and developing local economies
  • Building community, creating social glue and greater economic resilience
  • Modelling new ways of cooperating and new cultural paradigms.

Permaculture Magazine wants to specifically award money to permaculture projects that reach ordinary people and demonstrate best practice permaculture both in terms of ecological and socially / culturally innovative design. Any project can apply if it has been functioning for at least three years and has established its place within its community. Our panel of prestigious judges come from a range of backgrounds and work tirelessly to shortlist projects to be awarded. Learn more about our judges here:

2022

2022 marks the fifth year of the Permaculture Magazine Award with £30,000 to be shared between three prizes: Permaculture Magazine Award; Permaculture Prize sponsored by Lush Spring Prize and the Youth in Permaculture Prize sponsored by Ethos Foundation and Abundant Earth Foundation.

For full details on the PM Award and to apply visit: www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/permaculture-magazine-award-2022

2021

The 2021 Prize was awarded to Sector 39 who work in three African countries delivering practical training and education locally with skills such as seed saving, permaculture design, home gardening, building rocket stoves – to alleviate poverty, enhance nutrition, health and the local environment.

2020

The 2020 winners, Contour Lines Corp, on Guatemala’s coastline educate local farmers in regenerative farming methods, moving away from slash and burn agriculture, which is highly destructive to local landscapes.

For full details and to apply visit: www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/celebrating-activists-voices-permaculture-prize-for-projects-transforming-lives-and-landscapes

2019

2019 winners, African Women Rising, create innovative and long-term solutions to help solve food security in Palabek Refugee Camp, North Uganda.

For full details and to apply visit: www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/30000-permaculture-magazine-prize-celebrates-climate-change-solutions

2018

2018 winners, Ghana Permaculture Institute (GPI) train local farmers in a range of skills, including beekeeping and setting up indigenous tree nurseries, to create sustainable livelihoods that are also beneficial to the environment.

For full details and to apply visit: www.permaculture.co.uk/articles/25000-permaculture-magazine-prize-announces-winners

Youth in Permaculture Prize

This prize celebrates and supports young people, 25-years-old and under, who are using permaculture design principles to make positive change within their communities and local environment.

The Prize is sponsored by Abundant Earth Foundation, an initiative comprised of philanthropists and activists working to regenerate environmental and social landscapes by supporting others through pooling resources to create a more just and inclusive world for all. By giving funds directly to those implementing the projects, this grassroots approach to philanthropy offers a direct link between donations and impact. www.AbundantEarthFoundation.org

2022

Now in its fifth year, the £10,000 Youth in Permaculture Prize is awarded by Ethos Foundation and sponsored by Abundant Earth Foundation.

Full details can be found at: www.ethosfoundation.org.au/2022-youth-in-permaculture-prize

2021

In 2021 the prize was held by Lush Spring Prize, with four recipients sharing the award.

Nineteen-year-old Jefferson Rodolfo Anchundia Yumbo, president and spokesperson for Sacha Kuyrana Maltakuna in the Sachawaysa rainforest, Ecuador works to repair damaged soils and provide nutritious food to feed his community by promoting the planting of ancestral plants in home gardens. He helps give a voice to his Kichwa people through social media and ecotourism.

Schools and Colleges Permaculture Programme (SCOPE Kenya) teaches permaculture and agroecology through a holistic approach working with students, teachers, parents, local leaders and communities in Kenya.

The Malawi School Permaculture Clubs (MSPC) program is designed to improve sustainability and create true systemic change which is community-led and owned through a decentralised model to be self-run in the long-term.

Education for Climate Action offers programs working with youth refugees, asylum seekers and low income high school and college students in Malaysia who lost their livelihood during the pandemic.

2020

The Vijana Twaweza Club won in 2020. Set up by refugee youths, they work to combat extreme poverty and environmental degradation in Kakuma Refugee Camp and Kalobeyei Settlement in Kenya.

2019

Mohamed Qasim Lessani of Afghanistan won in 2019 due to his use of permaculture design to transform schools into models for basic human security, including food, water and energy – even in areas of extreme poverty, violence and war.

2018

The 2018 winner was 24-year-old Millicent Anyango, who uses permaculture methods to feed orphans, school children, and the homeless in Kenya. Millicent grew up an orphan in Kenya and now works at her orphanage teaching the children about fresh, nutritious food.