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recent content by Maddy Harland

Maddy Harland |
Sunday, 29th May 2011

I awake in the deep velvety dark of the night and write this editorial. Everything is changing. My psyche feels an unravelling, a flexing of the new. It was predicted years ago, not always in apocalyptic terms because change opens to the possibilities of undreamt opportunity. I won't catalogue the recent societal and global changes – I am sure you know – but I sense that we humans are becoming ever more aware of how interconnected we really are, to both the human and planetary systems.

 
Maddy Harland |
Tuesday, 24th May 2011

My first stop at the 2011 Chelsea Flower Show last Monday 23rd was the B&Q garden. Designed by Patrick Collins and architect Laurie Chetwood its brief was to be an urban edible garden, part apartment block and part allotment style strips. TV presenters Loraine Kelly and then Kirsty Allsop had turned the central walkway into a runway and press were jostling for a snap whilst Patrick nervously tended his plants before the judges appeared. Then Gwyneth Paltrow slowly sashayed down the centre, promoting her new book, and the long lenses of the photographers crowded the entire garden.

 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 27th April 2011

The Economics of Happiness portrays a world moving simultaneously in two opposing directions. On the one hand, government and big business continue to promote globalisation and the consolidation of corporate power whilst all around the world people are resisting those policies, and demanding a re-regulation of trade and finance. They are also starting to create a very different future. Communities are coming together to re-build more human scale, ecological economies based on a new paradigm – an economics of localisation.

 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 27th April 2011

We have three traditional pear trees in our forest garden but only one stands out, Merton's Pride. Flowering after the Asian Pear and the Cherry Plum as Springtime become firmly established, its blossom is incomparably delicate and is a riot of bees. One year I was so taken by the vigour and beauty of the tree's blossom that I made a flower remedy in the tradition of Dr Edward Bach, early one sunny morning. The bottle remains under my bed to this day. I give little samples to my friends from time to time but I have no idea what effect it has.

 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 6th April 2011

I worry about planting extotic sounding fruit trees in the forest garden. Our chalky soil and variable English climate has put paid to early experiments with freestanding peach, nectarine, and almonds which were billed by nurseries to be hardy for the south of England. With nearly 80 fruit and nut trees we cannot nurse the delicate and temperamental and our trees have to produce or they go.

 

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