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recent content by Maddy Harland

Maddy Harland |
Monday, 30th January 2017

What does permaculture have to do with politics? The original contraction of permanent agriculture to permaculture is also the contraction of permanent culture. Having identified perennial systems (treecrops and agroforestry, for example) as vital techniques to restore ecosystems, co-orginators, Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, quickly turned their attention to the ethics of earth care, people care and limits to growth/sharing surplus.

 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 2nd December 2016

Last February, Charles Dowding gave me some pieces of yacon (Smallanthus sonchifolius) from one of his crowns and advised me to pot them up and plant them outside in late Spring. I have always wanted to grow yacon so I went home and did just that.

 
Maddy Harland |
Wednesday, 23rd November 2016

Oca is a South American tuber with a lemony taste and pretty leaves. In warm climates Oxalis tuberosa (Oxalidaceae) is a perennial herbaceous plant and can overwinter as underground stem tubers known as uqa in Quechua. The plant is tradionally cultivated in the central and southern Andes for its tubers, which are used as a root vegetable.

In New Zealand it is known as a yam (although it isn't a true yam) and there are now a range of colours, including yellow, orange, pink, apricot, as well as the traditional red.

 
Maddy Harland |
Tuesday, 1st November 2016

Yesterday I published Albert Bates' Commonwealth post about an unprecedented event: a group of the world's most innovative, practical thinkers, researchers and activists were invited to the Commonwealth Offices to brainstorm about ways in which to restore our global climate. The Secretary-General, Baroness Patricia Scotland (she prefers to be called 'S.G.') made it clear that the Commonwealth nations have identified climate change as their top priority.

 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 21st October 2016

Last September, I was fortunatle to attend the European Permaculture Convergence in the beautiful medieval town of Bolsena in Tuscany. The event was a heady mixture of being with like minds and old friends, some excellent workshops and presentations, Italian hospitality, a beautiful landscape, and a sense of proximity with pre-Roman, Etruscan history.

 

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