Advertisement

Readers' Solutions

Katie Shepherd |
Friday, 26th July 2013
This year, I've made a conscious effort to explore the positive aspects of 'weed' control on the land I farm... and with good old docks, I've identified the following yields: The docks reduce compaction of the soil (long roots) Cutting them down by hand just before they seed, weakens the plant, and is good exercise for me! I observe the land... more
 
Permaculture magazine |
Friday, 19th July 2013
It's the ultimate Sunday scene. A suspended bed that will allow you to laze away a hot afternoon reading a novel. Somewhere to curl up in a blanket on a cool morning, enjoying the fresh air. This one has a particularly good view. All you need to make it are some branches, some string, some old rope and a futon - we ran out of wood and decided to... more
 
Cathy Ashley |
Sunday, 14th July 2013
Making cordials is a good way to use up surplus produce, to extend the eating season and to ‘add value’ to your crop. Like any culinary operation, cordial making is a mixture of science, cooking and washing-up. You need to balance the ratio of fruit to water to sweetener in order to obtain a tasty drink that keeps well, whilst not adding overly to... more
 
Fuggo King |
Friday, 12th July 2013
Here is a fun idea. We had to dismantle an old caravan on our smallholding. It had become too leaky to be fit for purpose so we experimented with using the base as a stage! Advantage: it has wheels! More fun solutions from our readers Build Your Own Solar and Wind Sound System How to Grow Just About Anything Offgrid Handwashing Solution How to... more
 
Steve Zezos |
Tuesday, 9th July 2013
I remember collecting eggs as a kid - it was one of my many jobs around the farm and I loved doing it. Not only for the wonderful taste of fresh home grown eggs, but the rewarding feeling of caring for these wonderful creatures too. Chickens have been a long overdue addition as a food source for me and this is something I'm about to remedy. First... more
 
Permaculture Magazine |
Friday, 5th July 2013
There are so many ways to recycle. Charity shops and groups like Freecycle and Freegle are always looking for donations. But there are some items that others may not want to buy or swap from second hand. We loved the Growing In a Nutshell Garden at Glastonbury, who have recycled a huge range of clothes, shoes and various items that others may not... more
 
Patrick Whitefied |
Monday, 17th June 2013
Your style and method of eating can change dramatically when living outdoors. During the summer, you may stock up on dry whole foods, formulate a stronger connection with your vegetable garden, or might be tempted to forage for wild food and look for clean sources of safe unchlorinated drinking water. Dry food Dried foods are the easiest to store... more
 
Permaculture magazine |
Friday, 14th June 2013
There probably isn't a vegetable easier to grow than rhubarb. Even in acold and damp summery climate when little else is flourishing, planting rhubarb is a breeze for any lazy gardener like me. Dividing up the root clumps (called crowns) creates mini plants and a prolific harvest if you really like your rhubarb but don't want to invest in new... more
 
Sebastian von Holstein |
Wednesday, 12th June 2013
Being permaculturists, we already think of resources as having multiple uses. We know that so called 'waste' logs can be used for a host of different things but have you ever been brave enough to attempt building a super sleek log lounger? You might be familiar with the now well-known pallet chair designs but here is something a little different,... more
 
Sebastian von Holstein |
Friday, 7th June 2013
Tumble composting can be a pricey enterprise, if you decide to buy any of the ready made options. These usually sit quite high up in the air, making it difficult to get composting materials in and out of it. The other benefit to having a low set tumbler is that you can make the most of the grounds natural heat, making for far more efficient... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 24th May 2013
This is an adaptation of an ancient method of irrigation that is thought to have originated in Africa 4,000 years ago. It uses the porous nature of clay pots to allow osmotic pressure to suck the water into the soil where it is needed. People use beautiful fired pots called Olla with a narrow neck buried in the soil. Unless you can make them... more
 
James Marshall |
Friday, 17th May 2013
Chickens do not have the ability to fly in the manner of wild birds, but certain breeds and determined individuals do have a propensity to propel themselves over fences, walls or even up into tree branches to roost. Whilst free range chicken keepers will be happy to let their flock roam within a specified area, 'flighty' birds will at best pose a... more
 

Pages

Advertisement