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Readers' Solutions

Sarah Johnstone |
Friday, 7th December 2012
You can never have too many mince pies at this time of year and if you make a large batch they freeze really well and can be thawed and warmed through as and when needed. The following recipe is from an old cookery book by Katie Stewart; the pastry works well and I particularly love the addition of ground almonds. Recipe makes approximately 24... more
 
Permaculture magazine |
Friday, 30th November 2012
Like ravenous sharks onto the scent of blood, it's our instinct that leads us down a leafy garden path towards a rich, balmy aroma. Pulses race as the door opens to release a wave of the exotic smell we all hold dear. We've been waiting for this moment for weeks: a workshop in Raw Chocolate Alchemy led by Sarmado Sibley. Sarmado has worked all... more
 
Sarah Johnstone |
Friday, 23rd November 2012
This recipe is sugar free and suitable for vegetarians. If you have a wheat intolerance use a gluten free bread for the crumbs. Ingredients Serves 10 – 15 175g raisins175g sultanas175g currants75g chopped cherries175g pitted ready- to-eat prunes175g dried apricots75g chopped almonds250g fresh breadcrumbs250g shredded vegetarian suet1 teaspoon... more
 
Groundwork Solent |
Wednesday, 21st November 2012
Ever wanted to make your very own bird hide but been put off by the cost and the construction of what is a well built wooden shed? Be put off no more. With just a few willow whips you can weave your own hide with willow cuttings. As part of the Green Learning for the Alver Valley Project, Hampshire, which creates opportunities for local people to... more
 
Emily Ingham |
Wednesday, 14th November 2012
Don't hibernate just yet: head outside! Planting garlic, beans and peas now will hopefully ensure an earlier and better crop next year. It may look like they're not doing anything over winter, but that's OK – too much growth and they'll be susceptible to frost. Around now is your last chance to get garlic in to the ground (or your pots!) – go on,... more
 
Sarah Johnstone |
Friday, 9th November 2012
I love this time of year as Pumpkins and Squash are in abundant supply. Don't just opt for the standard orange pumpkins that are sold for Halloween; other varieties are now becoming readily available so hunt them out at your local farm shop or farmer's market. The 'Crown Prince' variety has a bluey-grey skin and dense orange flesh which has a... more
 
Emily Ingham |
Tuesday, 6th November 2012
The popularity of our recent articles such as downsizing; sustainable cities and low-impact transport options proves that permaculture is not merely a solution for smallholders, farmers and families living in the countryside, but for city dwellers too. Living in cities offers great opportunities for us to reduce our footprints. This may seem like... more
 
Carl Legge |
Friday, 2nd November 2012
The nasturtium plant (tropaeoleum majus) is one of the most useful plants in the garden. It attracts pollinating insects and acts as a sacrificial plant for brassicas by attracting caterpillars to its leaves. Its flowers, leaves, seed pods and seeds are prolific & edible and it readily self-seeds. The whole plant has a peppery, watercress-like... more
 
Sebastian von Holstein |
Sunday, 28th October 2012
As you would expect, cases of SAD are much higher in cold, dark places but it is also largely a symptom of the modern world. It is estimated that 75% of the population used to work outdoors in natural outdoor light as opposed to only 10% presently. Concentrated city environments all see a higher number of sufferers due to high office hours and... more
 
Carl Legge |
Friday, 26th October 2012
If you don’t grow your own, you may see big bunches of parsley in markets. It’s well worth picking these up to make this wonderful ingredient the French call persillade. Persillade in its most basic form is just a mix of finely chopped parsley and garlic. It can also have oil, vinegar or citrus juice and salt added. In my version, the oil protects... more
 
Phil Moore |
Monday, 15th October 2012
Renegade architect Mike Reynolds and his crew began construction in March 2012. Commissioned by an ex-pat British family, the building is situated on a huge piece of land with a cacao farm, an important and popular crop in this part of the world. Richard and Alisa arrived in Belize two years ago having lived in Scotland, Spain, and Mexico with... more
 
Michael Hutchinson |
Thursday, 11th October 2012
Making a DIY wormery is easy. I found two cheap plastic basins the same size – you can use plastic crates from any DIY store or car boot sale. I first drilled holes in the bottom of one basin to allow any liquid to drain out. This can be collected in a tray and diluted 1:10 and used as liquid fertiliser. Four holes were then drilled in the sides... more
 

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