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Readers' Solutions

Patrick Whitefield |
Friday, 10th May 2013
When I bought my first tipi, I already had an all weather tent, a good set of bender tarps and a choice of two caravans to live in. What did I need a tipi for? None of that mattered. I fell in love with the sheer beauty of it. The beauty goes far deeper than appearances. The circle is an organic, healing shape, powerful medicine for anyone who has... more
 
Maddy Harland |
Friday, 3rd May 2013
How many times have you visited chemical or better compost loos at an event or festival and found the water reservoir has run out and you can't wash your hands? I spotted this clever use of recycled materials at Offgrid Festival in Somerset last year. (Incidently, Offgrid had to be my favourite last year, possibly because I bumped into... more
 
Rozie Apps |
Friday, 26th April 2013
Graffiti tends to have a negative impact on communities. Many people do not see it as art, but vandalism to their towns, cities and society. It can cost councils a huge amount of money to remove graffiti and this money could be much better spent. A new style of graffiti has been spreading through the cities of the world, turning brown, white or... more
 
Dyatica |
Friday, 19th April 2013
Many public transit systems actively prohibit bringing on bicycles. Called intermodal transportation it involves using two or more forms of transportation in a journey. This innovative solution from Stuttgart, Germany adds desperately needed bicycle accommodation on this light rail / tram line. Bicycles can often increase the use of public transit... more
 
Rozie Apps |
Friday, 5th April 2013
Spring is slowly arriving and it is time to begin with the seed sowing. I have been waiting all winter to begin planting my tiny little seeds in some warm compost, ready to nurture them into the world. Searching for the best information about sowing seeds I have found some brilliant idea's for seedling pots, all that come from recycled products in... more
 
Rozie Apps |
Friday, 29th March 2013
I remember when I was a child, my Dad built a beautiful trellis in our cottage garden. It was made from wood and arched above the path that leads to the front door. It was built for the beautiful apricot coloured rose that was planted in my little metre square patch of the garden where once upon a time I grew radishes and cornflowers. When the... more
 
Sarah Johnstone |
Friday, 22nd March 2013
Much as we love rhubarb crumble and custard it is always good to ring the changes and find other recipes for using rhubarb and there are lots of options, both sweet and savoury. Type rhubarb into your search engine and you will be overwhelmed by the range of recipes to try. If you want to keep things simple make a rhubarb compote by gently... more
 
John Yeoman |
Friday, 8th March 2013
A few more wild food sources to gain all the nutrients we need and all for free. Wild mushrooms The British are fond of mushrooms. We eat at least 28,000 tons annually of just one species, the Agaricus campestris, which has arguably one of the least interesting flavours of any edible fungi, but merely lives longer on the market stall. Meanwhile,... more
 
Permaculture magazine |
Thursday, 28th February 2013
If you can't resist but feast on the occasional big bowl of crisps or chips but you're afraid to pack on the pounds, fulfil your desire with a bowl of kale crisps. This dense green nutritious chip will surely satisfy your cravings! A healthy crisp/chip alternative Green vegetables can sometimes be too cooling in winter but not the little curly... more
 
Wendy Ogden |
Sunday, 24th February 2013
Roof gardens are known to make use of valuable growing space in urban areas and can be very productive. I'm using the roof of our duck house to over-winter some hardy plants that were raised from cuttings and seed in late summer and early autumn.These plants are all grown for their flowers, various dianthus, sweet peas, and other hardy annuals,... more
 
John Yeoman |
Tuesday, 12th February 2013
The last three of our wild delights. Free and all the body needs nutritionally. Chickweed (Stellaria media) Although often more prominent in January than August, the fragile-looking chickweed plagues gardeners at any time. But its succulent sweet leaves hold ample minerals - especially copper and iron - and they are the equal of watercress in both... more
 
John Yeoman |
Friday, 8th February 2013
There’s an Asian superstition (as well as a permaculture mentality) that you must eat up every grain of rice left in the bowl. It also makes sense with breadcrumbs. Never throw away breadcrumbs. Even if they’re past eating, you can make fishing bait, mix them with glue as home-made ‘plastic wood’ filler, or even bag them for bookends. If they’re... more
 

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